Friday, March 14, 2014

On This Day In Strength History

Henry Milo Steinborn was born on March 14, 1894. In 1920 he won the German Championships in weightlifting doing a specialty "Deep Knee Bend" with the tremedous poundage of 530 lbs. putting this heavy weight on his back unassisted.

Thursday, March 13, 2014

On This Day In Strength History

 In Los Angeles on  March 13, 1948 at the Shrine auditorium, in front of a huge 5,500 crowd, Clancy Ross entered the Mr. USA contest, open to all professional bodybuilders. The line up of former top title holders included Eric Pederson, Floyd Page, Al Stephen, Jim Payne, Leo Stern and Steve Reeves. Jack La Lanne put on a hand balancing act, Pudgy Stockton, the first real lady bodybuilder, was there and the Mighty Mac Bachelor defended his wrist wrestling championship.
Clancy Ross won 1st place. Steve Reeves, Mr. America 1947, came second and Alan Stephen a former Mr. America also, came in 3rd.

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Friday, March 7, 2014

Top Six Food Options For the Diabetic Athlete


Diabetic Athlete:


Top Six Food Options

By Keith Payne


For Diabetic athletes, nutrition should be a “huge” priority considering the constant battle you face to keep blood sugar in a normal range. Here are some great food options to incorporate into your diet. The following foods have a low glycemic index rating, are loaded with vitamins and provide needed fiber. Keep in mind these foods should be included in your daily diet in sensible portions.

 

Dark Green Leafy Vegetables

Spinach and Kale as well as many other dark green leafy vegetables are superfoods that are packed with vitamins and fiber. These vegetables are so low in carbohydrates you can eat virtually as much as you want.

Fish

Baked Salmon is a great choice because it is high in Omega-3 Fatty Acids as well as protein. 

Beans

Beans (pinto, navy, kidney, black beans) are great sources of protein. They are high in fiber and contain high amounts of magnesium and potassium.

Sweet Potatoes

Packed full of vitamin A and fiber, sweet potatoes have a lower GI than the starchy white potato.

Fruit

Berries (strawberries, blueberries) and citric fruit (grapefruit, oranges, lemons and limes) are loaded with antioxidants and fiber. They are also great sources of vitamin C.

Nuts

A handful of nuts can help you manage hunger and at the same time provide healthy fats and vitamins such as magnesium.

 

Whole grains and low fat milk products can be good foods for the diabetic as well. Word of caution: many people are allergic to some grains and milk products and don’t realize it.


While we are on the subject of food, if you are using any dietary supplements I would advise you to READ THE LABEL. Pay particular attention to the carbohydrate/sugar content. Many pre workout and protein drinks are loaded with sugar! Choose the low sugar supplements.


Keith Payne CSN, CPT, YFS

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Supportive Gear Is Not For Novice Lifters

Powerlifting 101: 
Supportive Gear Is Not For Novice Lifters
Unfortunately, over the years I have seen many novice powerlifters compete in bench shirts and squat suits. Many times these lifters are accompanied by “equipped” training partners or advisors who have encouraged the novice lifter to jump into supportive gear too soon. The novice lifter has not had the opportunity to gain a good raw strength base because they tend to spend an inordinate amount of time training and competing in supportive gear. It is not unusual to see these same lifters compete for years without getting noticeably stronger.
Give yourself a chance to learn how to build a good raw strength foundation and continue to improve upon it before adding the supportive gear. (especially if you are in the youth/teen divisions).
Keith Payne

Monday, March 3, 2014

Powerlifting 101: Proper Deadlift Grip


Powerlifting 101: 

PROPER DEADLIFT GRIP

Grip is a seminal factor when it comes to how much you can Deadlift. Simply put, you cannot Deadlift what you can’t hold. We all have seen a lifter pull a big weight only to watch him drop it two inches before lock out. DON’T BE THAT LIFTER!
                  
    

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure A   Bar is too far toward the middle of the hand.                  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure B  Bar is more toward the fingers.

So, how do you grip the bar? A good grip begins with the correct placement of the bar in the hand. If the bar is held toward the middle of the hand (figure A) it will move down the hand when the weight gets heavy during the deadlift. When this happens you are likely to lose your grip more often than not. This phenomenon also causes the skin to fold which in turn causes calluses to form. It is far better to place the bar in your hands near to the fingers (figure B). All your fingers and both thumbs should be wrapped around the bar. The bar should be gripped very hard. This will actually enhance your strength according to Sir Charles Sherrington’s “Law of Irradiation”. This principle states that a muscle working hard recruits the neighboring muscle, and if they are already part of the action, it amplifies their strength.

During the Deadlift the bar tends to roll if your grip is not strong. For this reason the mixed (sometimes called alternated) grip is preferred by most competitive powerlifters. When using the mixed grip the palm of your dominate hand should be facing up with the other hand facing down. Therefore, if the bar begins to roll out of one hand it will in effect be rolling into the other hand. This usually allows the lifter to hold the bar longer.

Since this article is directed toward the novice competitive powerlifter I do not recommend an overhand grip or hook grip unless you have Olympic lifting experience. Usually beginner powerlifters do not possess the grip strength or skill to utilize these techniques.

Needless to say (but I will anyway) none of this matters if you don’t have a strong grip. We will talk about how to train your grip in the next article.

Keith Payne CPT, YFS


 

Powerlifting 101 articles are focused on primary fundamentals of powerlifting and are designed to help novice lifters. For more Powerlifting 101 articles visit www.functionalstrengthsystems.com

Please contact us with your comments and/or questions.

 

Functional Strength Systems and the contributors to FSS's website are not engaged in rendering medical advice, and the contents of FSS's website are not intended to take the place of such advice. Please consult a physician or physical therapist before using any of the information, advice or any of the services on our website. This includes all resources on this website.

FSS's website and its contents are made available without warranties or guarantees of any kind. FSS disclaims any liability for injury or damage resulting from the use of the FSS website or any information, advice, services, or other resources that may be mentioned or made accessible through our website or by our instructors, trainers or representatives of FSS. FSS further disclaims any liability for injury or damage personal or otherwise resulting from the actions or advice of the instructors certified by FSS in the performance of their duties.

Friday, February 28, 2014

On This Day In Strength History

Charles Vinci was born: 2-28-1933. He won gold medals at the 1955 and 1959 Pan American games. He received silver medals in the 1955 and 1958 world championships. He was the United States Senior National Champion from 1954 to 1956 and from 1958 to 1961.

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Super Food: Pumpkin


Did you know pumpkin is a great post workout food? Well, a cup of pumpkin contains more potassium than a banana. Potassium helps restore electrolyte balance in the body after a hard workout. Pumpkin is also a rich source of beta-carotene that may reduce the risk of developing certain types of cancer including those of the lung, colon, bladder, cervical, breast, and skin. Pumpkin is a great low calorie source of fiber.

Nutrition Facts
(1 cup cooked, boiled, drained, without salt)

Calories 49
Protein 2 grams
Carbohydrate 12 grams
Dietary Fiber 3 grams
Calcium 37 mg
Iron 1.4 mg
Magnesium 22 mg
Potassium 564 mg

Zinc 1 mg
Selenium .50 mg
Vitamin C 12 mg
Niacin 1 mg
Folate 21 mcg
Vitamin A 2650 IU
Vitamin E 3 mg

 

Keith Payne

Functional Strength Systems

Sunday, January 26, 2014

Powerlifting 101: How to Improve Your Squat


Powerlifting 101:

 

How to Improve Your Squat

 

How can I improve my squat? I hear this question frequently at the gym from aspiring powerlifters and rightfully so. It’s an excellent question. Let me answer this as directly as I know how. If you want to improve your Squat….you need to squat! (For that matter if you want to improve your Deadlift you need to squat. But that is another subject for another time.)

Not to be redundant, but squatting and more squatting is the answer if you want to build a powerful squat. I know this seems simplistic but it’s the truth. There is no exercise that can duplicate the strengthening effect on the complete posterior chain (particularly regarding hip extension) more than the squat. This fact I think would be undisputed by most accomplished squatters and strength coaches. You wouldn’t know it by watching lifters train. More often than not I see powerlifters spending an excessive amount of time doing other exercises that they think will improve their squat numbers. In my opinion your squat potential will never be realized by doing leg presses, hack squats, leg curls, leg extensions etc.

In most cases, barbell exercises are far more effective than machines.

 

Here are two reasons why machines are not the answer.

  1. When using machines all movement is restricted by the machine design.
  2. Muscles are isolated and forced to function separately.

There are many more convoluted reasons including balance issues why machines are not beneficial but these two are enough for now.

 

It is not uncommon to see lifters improve certain muscle groups while failing to improve others because they train on machines. Obviously this can become problematic for powerlifters when trying to develop an all inclusive full body movement such as the squat.

 

Barbell exercises such as the back squat allow all body parts to work in unison in natural movement patterns. This can not be duplicated by using a machine.

 

Powerlifting 101 articles are focused on primary fundamentals of powerlifting and are designed to help novice lifters. For more Powerlifting 101 articles visit www.functionalstrengthsystems.com

Please contact us with your comments and/or questions.

 

Keith Payne CPT, YFS


 

Functional Strength Systems and the contributors to FSS's website are not engaged in rendering medical advice, and the contents of FSS's website are not intended to take the place of such advice. Please consult a physician or physical therapist before using any of the information, advice or any of the services on our website. This includes all resources on this website.

FSS's website and its contents are made available without warranties or guarantees of any kind. FSS disclaims any liability for injury or damage resulting from the use of the FSS website or any information, advice, services, or other resources that may be mentioned or made accessible through our website or by our instructors, trainers or representatives of FSS. FSS further disclaims any liability for injury or damage personal or otherwise resulting from the actions or advice of the instructors certified by FSS in the performance of their duties.

Monday, January 20, 2014

On This Day In Strength History

Paul Von Boeckmann Born January 20, 187l.    Paul Von Boeckmann was a strongman from New York City toward the end of the 19th century.  Von Boeckmann felt that one of the Secrets to great strength and physical development had much to do with building large, powerful lungs through breathing exercises and taught these techniques by mail order for years.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

On This Day In Strength History




Josef Steinbach of Vienna, Austria, was one of the greatest weightlifters and strongmen of the early 20th century. Some of his best marks include: a two-hand Continental and Jerk of 387 pounds, a two-hands Snatch of 264-3/4 pounds and a two-hand Continental and press of 335 pounds (besting Louis Cyr's mark by 34 pounds.) He won the world amateur weightlifting title from 1904 through 1906 and went on to win the Gold medal in the "One Arm" event and a Silver medal in the "Two Arm" event at the 1906 Olympics.
Josef Steinbach died on January 15, 1937.


Friday, November 22, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

November 22, 1935, Tony Terlazzo became first American to make an International Weightlifting Federation world record.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

John Grimek: Died November 20, 1998. Before John became a physique champion, he was a part of the 1936 USA Weightlifting Team at the Berlin Olympics.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

November 14, 1922, Richard K. Fox died.  Richard K. Fox was the publisher of "The Police Gazette" a 19th century magazine which reported on boxing, wrestling and feats of strength that might interest the public.

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

November 13, 1933, David Gentle was born. David Gentle is an internationally recognized Author and Historian of Physical Culture.  For several decades, he has been a regular contributor of over 25 of the world's top muscle magazines.

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

November 6, 1971 the first World Powerlifting Championships were held in York Pennsylvania.

Thursday, October 31, 2013

NC POWERLIFTING COACH FOR 2014 SPECIAL OLYMPICS

I've been selected to be the Team NC Powerlifting Coach for the 2014 Special Olympics National Games!! I am honored and blessed to be chosen to lead this team. What a powerlifting weekend this has been! Nelda Newton

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

Hermann Goerner performed a one-hand deadlift of 727.25 pounds on October 8,1920.

Monday, October 7, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

Oct. 7, 1989 - Marvin Eder received the Association of Oldetime Barbell & Strongmen Highest Achievement Award.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

Karl Abs was born September 17, 1851,  known as "The German Oak" he was the first man in Germany to continental and jerk 330 pounds. He accomplished this feat back in 1885. He also won the European Greco-Roman Heavyweight Championship in 1894.

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

On July 31, 1955 in front of a crowd of 1000 people Paul Anderson posted (390, 305, 400,) total of 1095 in the weightlifting competition at the Colonna picnic.

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

In the United Kingdom, on July 24, 1913, at Crystal Palace, London, Edward Aston became the first Englishman to lift 300 lbs. overhead with one hand.

Saturday, July 13, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

John Henry Davis died July 13, 1984. He was an Olympic superheavyweight weightlifter for the United States. John won gold at the 1948 and 1952 summer Olympic Games, as well as 6 World Weightlifting Championships and 12 national championships. He was unbeaten from 1938 to 1953.

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

This Day In Strength History

Louis Attila was born July 2, 1844. He is credited with inventing the shot loaded globe barbell and the “Human Bridge” stunt that later became a regular part in many strongman acts. He was also the inventor of the Bent Press and was the first person to do 200 pounds in this lift.

Friday, June 28, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

Jun 28, 2003 - Vic Boff  received the Association of Oldetime Barbell & Strongmen Highest Achievement Award.

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

On This Day In Stregth History

Abbye “Pudgy” Stockton played a central role in popularizing physical culture and exercise for women in the central decades of the Twentieth Century. She lived primarily in Santa Monica, CA during her long life. In the late 1930s she began working out with friends at Muscle Beach and quickly became famous for her rare combination of beauty, strength and muscularity. Pudgy Stockton died June 26, 2006.

Monday, June 24, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

June 24, 1961 - Frank Spellman lifted at the Senior National Weightlifting Championships in Santa Monica, CA. He took First Place in the 165 Class at a bodyweight of 163 1/4 with lifts of 260lb. press - 230lb. snatch - 310lb. clean and jerk for an 800 lb. total. This was Frank Spellman's last contest.

Thursday, June 20, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

Tony Garcy was born June 20, 1939. Garcy represented the USA in the 60 and 64 Olympics. He broke American Records in the press in the 148 and 165 divisions.

Sunday, June 16, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

John Davis set a world record on 6/16/1951 in the  Clean & Jerk - 182 kg Super Heavyweight in Los Angeles.

Monday, June 10, 2013

On This Day In Strength History


Joseph Nicholas "Joe" DePietro was born June 10, 1914. He was an American weightlifter from Paterson, New Jersey, both World champion and Olympic champion. He won a gold medal at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London.

Sunday, June 9, 2013

On This Day In Strength History


Launceston Elliot was born on the ninth of June, 1874, in India, where his father was a magistrate. Looking very much like Sandow, although much larger, Launceston Elliot was one of the most respected figures in the world of strength at the turn of the century when this form of entertainment was at its height.
Elliot won for Britain the first Olympic gold medal for weightlifting.
The scene was Athens, Greece in April 1896 when Baron Pierre de Coubertin revived the Olympic Games. Weightlifting was supervised by Crown Prince George of Greece and Elliot did a one hand lift of 71 kilos (156 1/2 pounds) to win that event.

Friday, June 7, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

June 7, 1939 Charles Batta died. Though primarily a performer Batta could one arm snatch 154.5 pounds, put over head 209 pounds with one hand, and hold by the ring a weight of 55 pounds at arms length. During his performance he would lift 259 pounds over head with ease.  One of Batta’s challenges was to place a glass of water, a bottle, some gold rings and other jewels plus some gold coins on the seat of a straight back chair. He would then lift the chair with one hand at arms length by one of the horizontal rungs and not spill any of the water. He offered what was on the chair to anyone who could duplicate his lift. No one ever did.

Thursday, June 6, 2013

This Day In Strength History

June 6, 1942 Chuck Amato was born. Amato competed in bodybuilding for nearly 20 years, and judged competitions as well. Dave Draper once called Amato his favorite "clean" bodybuilder.

Saturday, June 1, 2013

This Day In Strength History


John Terpak died June 1, 1993. He was recognized for participating in sixty consecutive national championships as a lifter, coach and judge. He won those nationals twelve times, and one span from 1936 to 1945 was a literal decade of victory.

Friday, May 24, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

May 24, 1941 John Grimek at age 30 wins the AAU Mr. America at the Arena Sports Palace 45th & Market, Philadelphia, PA.

Thursday, May 23, 2013

On This Day In Strength History



May 23, 1987- Bert Goodrich, Milo Steinborn, Johnny Mandel received the Association of Oldetime Barbell & Strongmen Highest Achievement Award.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

On This Day In Strength History


May 21, 2011 Joseph Greenstein, aka The Mighty Atom was inducted into the York Barbell Hall of Fame.

Friday, April 19, 2013

The Forbidden Rice

http://kbyefat.tumblr.com/post/48361282508/the-forbidden-rice

Apr 19, 2013

The Forbidden Rice

Last night, Kyle and I tried black rice for the first time. I went to Costco a few nights ago on the hunt for quinoa and saw it on the shelf. I decided to buy it not really knowing the nutritional benefits of it… but still wanting to take a whirl. The few things I read on the package sounded pretty good and I thought it was a steal paying $6 for a gigantic bag.
It was actually pretty tasty—it has a nutty flavor and a good bite to it. The cooking directions on the bag weren’t very specific so Kyle just kind of winged it but it turned out great. We served it with some stir fry. It turned a beautiful dark purple once it cooked… and it also turned our mouths a beautiful dark purple once we ate. :-) We have since read that rinsing the rice before cooking may prevent that from happening next time.
I’ve done a little research last night and this morning about black rice and I’ve found some pretty awesome stuff. It grows in various parts of Asia. Waaay back in the day, black rice was only meant for emperors and royalty. A person would be executed for stealing even a handful or eating it without permission—that’s why people call it “forbidden rice.” Crazy, right? Emperors thought that consuming black rice would allow them to live longer. Modern day science has begun to prove they were probably right.
Here are some stellar health-improving facts about black rice:
1) Black rice is a fountain of youth. It is jam-packed with antioxidants. Several sources I read said it contains more than blueberries, which is commonly known for its antioxidant properties. This is super awesome because blueberries are way more expensive and I’m glad a broke kid like me can get so much black rice on the cheap. Antioxidants have been proven to prevent or treat conditions like heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Diabetes and cancer run in my family so you can bet I’m adding black rice to my regular diet. Annnnd they say it has anti-aging properties. Way cool, my friends.
2) Black rice is a ninja. It breaks down plaque in your arteries and fights against cholesterol. Black rice is also known as an anti-inflammatory food. Everyone, say Kbye to heart attacks and life threatening infections and illnesses! …I mean obviously you can’t eat black rice and not change anything else about your lifestyle, but this seems like an awesome supplement to healthy living. Don’t you think?
3) Black rice is the champion. It beats all of its brother rice in the nutrition competition (especially white rice). It is the only rice that contains anthocyanin. Anthocyanin is especially awesome because it is a water-soluble antioxidant that can reach certain areas of the body that fat-soluble antioxidants cannot. Also, B Rice has a TON of fiber—great for digestion! And is very high in iron and vitamin E. Another win!
4) Black rice works for mice. I read about a study being conducted where researchers are feeding mice about 10% black rice in their diet. This significantly suppressed skin allergies on the mice. I have eczema and if black rice can improve it, I’m go team!
5) Black rice is DElicious! When Kyle cooked it he barely seasoned it. Woot woot for a food that is low in sodium as well.
All these facts combined make black rice one of the best foods ever. BLACK RICE IS MAGICAL.
As you can tell, I’m super excited about this new “super food” I’ve stumbled upon. I’ve been looking up recipes to try and I’ll definitely share with you how they turn out. Stay tuned!
 
Ashley Macon CSN

On This Day In Strength History

April 19, 1933 Karl Swoboda died. In 1910 Swoboda was the first man to lift 400 pounds over his head.

Friday, April 5, 2013

On This Day In Strength History


April 5, 1940 John Davis bent pressed the Rolandow dumbell.
 

John Davis seen here lifting Apollon's railroad car wheels.


Thursday, April 4, 2013

On This Day In Stregnth History

Emile Deriaz died April 4, 1939, he was around sixty years of age. A few days before his death he entertained a few friends with a display of impromptu lifting with beer barrels. This recalled his strongman act wherein he used to lift at arms’ length overhead a barrel of around 250 lbs. In his heyday as “The Modern Samson”  he had done much traveling to fill some very lucrative engagements.

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

April 2, 1916 Donald Dinnie died. As Scotland's greatest athlete, Dinnie competed in sixteen Highland Games seasons in his native land. He first toured the United States' Caledonian Circuit in 1870. In that ...year he earned a fortune. Dinnie, then thirty-three, was titled "The Nineteenth Century's Greatest Athlete". However, others despised and criticized Dinnie for his incredible strength. He continued to tour, and in his 60th year he was in New Zealand and Australia as a successful professional athlete.

FSS at IBP Bench Night



More Pics
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Sunday, March 31, 2013

On This Day In Strength History

During his most active period, circa 1896, Louis Cyr performed the following:--March 31st did clean and jerk of 347 lbs., then a World record, without science or skill, little if any dipping.  Louis Cyr: Strongest Man Who Ever Lived
By David Gentle

Saturday, March 30, 2013

Morning Juice

carrot, apple, greens, cucumber, celery

On This Day In Strength History

Elise Gillaine Herbigneaux (Miss Apollina), was born in Tongrine, Belgium on March 30,1875. Apollina toured London and the other cities showcasing her feats of strength. In her stage performances, she would engage local wrestlers to raise audience excitement and regularly wrestled men.